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Partnership [clear filter]
Wednesday, November 14
 

9:45am

Closing the Access Gap to STEM for Underserved Student Populations
Consider joining this collaborative partnership program bringing, at no cost to partner high schools, AP® science to underserved school populations.

Economically disadvantaged students in many urban, rural, and small suburban communities don’t have access to rigorous physics courses. Lacking opportunity to access such courses, these demographic groups are hard pressed to compete in physical science related Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics fields and academic programs with their peers from more affluent communities. Project Accelerate, a National Science Foundation funded project, is a partnership program between Boston University, West Virginia University and high schools bringing a College Board accredited AP® Physics 1 course to schools not offering this opportunity.

Preliminary results indicate that students participating in Project Accelerate do as well as their peers enrolled in traditional classroom-based AP® Physics 1 classes. Project Accelerate creates a collaborative learning environment utilizing the supportive infrastructures from the students’ traditional school with a highly interactive private edX online instructional tool. This pairing provides opportunities for under-represented groups who otherwise would not have access to this often prerequisite course to success in physical science, information technology and medical-related academic and career pathways.

Project Accelerate contains the potential to support hundreds of schools and thousands of students throughout the country bringing opportunity for success in STEM to under-served and economically disadvantaged young men and woman.

Moderators
MD

Mark D. Greenman

Research Fellow, Boston University

Speakers
AF

Ali Ferhani

Student, Community Charter School of Cambridge
AF

Andrew Flye

Science Teacher, Boston International Newcomer Academy
JM

Jeff Molk

Department Chair, Community Charter School of Cambridge


Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room E

9:45am

Discover Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience Program
Take your students on an unforgettable, two-month, world-wide STEM adventure with Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience program. Your students will virtually cruise aboard the TS Kennedy with cadets majoring in Marine Engineering, Marine Transportation, and Facilities Engineering who are taking part in their annual Sea Term. Students will also follow the Winter Experiences of cadets majoring in Marine Safety Science & Environmental Protection, Energy Systems Engineering, International Maritime Business and Emergency Management & Homeland Security as they study around the globe.

Administrators, teachers, librarians, and parents will love the comprehensive Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience curriculum linked to the Common Core Mathematics Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards. The curriculum also incorporates language arts, social studies, and fine arts. Many of the engaging lessons and hands-on activities were created exclusively for Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

During this session, you will be introduced to the Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience program, discover its history, and view evidence of the program’s success.  You’ll also get a preview of the expanded 2019 Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience program which promises to be bigger and better than ever. We’ll provide the information needed to register a class, a grade level, or an entire school.

Don’t miss Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s one-of-a-kind 2019 STEM adventure on land and sea!

Speakers
NA

Nancy A. Franks

Follow The Voyage - Share The Experience Coordinator, Massachusetts Maritime Academy


Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Conference Room 210

9:45am

Pathways to STEM Student Success and Workforce Development
There is a growing demand for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals, but the number of STEM graduates is not keeping pace. UMass Boston College of Science and Mathematics (CSM) had been no exception to the problem of low graduation rates, an issue made particularly urgent considering the opportunity we have, as a minority-majority college, to contribute to the diversity of the STEM pipeline and workforce. This urgent issue led to careful analysis of student data to identify the “leaks” in the pipeline and the utilization of a multidimensional approach incorporating data-driven strategies and interventions that strengthened our pipeline and improved success rates for students. The strategies and interventions work synergistically to enable our students to succeed and persist in STEM fields. CSM has successfully leveraged the community concept, which begins with the Freshman Success Community (FSC) Program.  The FSC serves as a platform to address the needs of first-year STEM students, provide an enriched academic experience, and increase motivation to pursue STEM. CSM has developed collaborative relationships with external corporate and institutional partners to support student research and internships. As students make progress through their STEM education (the pipeline), they participate in these high-impact practices and vertical learning communities to generate awareness of STEM careers, increase their confidence in their STEM capabilities, build their network through mentorship with faculty, peers, and industry professionals, and acquire the knowledge and technical and soft skills to be successful in college and pursue rewarding and productive careers in STEM.

Moderators
AG

Andrew Grosovsky

Dean, College of Science and Mathematics, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Speakers
MM

Marshall Milner

Executive Director Science Training Programs, University of Massachusetts, Boston


Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room C

9:45am

STEM4Girls: Hands-on Experience to Engage 3rd-8th Grade Girls in STEM
In this session we talk about the STEM4Girls program, which is a one-day experience at UMass Dartmouth in which girls in grades 3-8 spend the day on campus engaged in STEM activities and talking to STEM professionals. In this session, we will talk about the design of the program and findings from our surveys. We will talk about the structure of the event, approaches that have worked, building partnerships with faculty from across the University as well as local teachers, enrollment in the program, and the design of activities for the participants. We will include testimonials about what STEM4Girls has meant to different stakeholders ranging from the girls who participate, the volunteer college students and the workshop leaders. Then, we will have open discussion with all participants about creating these experiences elsewhere in the Commonwealth.

Speakers
SK

Shakhnoza Kayumova

Assistant Professor, Kaput Center for Research & Innovation in STEM Education at UMass Dartmouth
CO

Chandra Orrill

Director, Kaput Center for Research & Innovation in STEM Education at UMass Dartmouth
SW

Stephen Witzig

Associate Professor, Kaput Center for Research & Innovation in STEM Education at UMass Dartmouth


Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Grand Ballroom South

9:45am

Tech Apprentice: 10 Years of Learning to Inform Employer Engagement
Through Tech Apprentice, the Boston Private Industry Council has focused on IT/tech internships as a subset of its overall Youth Summer Employment Program in partnership with the Mayor and the Boston Public Schools for over 10 years. In 2017 the PIC sought to understand how these very early pipeline efforts where impacting the future labor force and how programming and systemic work might evolve to meet the demand for greater scale, preparation and diversity in the tech workforce. This panel presentation and discussion will focus on:
  • Approaches for employer engagement and relationship cultivation;
  • More about the Tech Apprentice Signal Success curriculum and its potential for talent outreach, identification, and preparation;
  • What employers can do to be receptive environments for aspiring technologists;
  • Increasing student diversity through alignment with career and technical education pathways.

Moderators
AO

Alysia Ordway

Employer Engagement Director, Boston Private Industry Council

Speakers
JA

Jennifer Applebaum

Director of Youth Employment, Curriculum & Training, Youth Pathways, Commonwealth Corporation
BM

Bea Mitchell

Director, Technology, DTCC
OP

Olivia Paquette

Senior Career Specialist, Charlestown High School, Boston Private Industry Council
BS

Bruce Stephen

Employer Engagement Director, Boston Private Industry Council
MS

Michelle Sylvaria

Executive Director of Career and Technical Education High Schools, Boston Public Schools


Wednesday November 14, 2018 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room D

10:55am

A Data-Driven Approach to Aligning Higher Education Programs With Workforce Needs
Learn how accessible, on-line data on job trends in STEM industries can help guide curriculum, connect with industry and improve career awareness among students. As we work to build the STEM pipeline and create career pathways for students, educators need to have access to clear data and analysis that effectively conveys the skill needs of STEM industries. By examining an ongoing partnership between the biopharmaceutical industry and higher education, facilitated by the MassBioEd Foundation, attendees will learn how the daunting task of aligning education programs with the skill requirements of STEM employers can be greatly eased by the effective use of available data on hiring trends. This session includes panelists from higher education, industry and a data provider, who will share how access to such data and analysis has created a common ground for industry and higher education to come together to help direct alignment around skills development and provide new tools for educators at the secondary and post-secondary level to better create awareness among students about careers in the life sciences, for which 12,000 additional jobs will need to be filled by 2023.

Moderators
PA

Peter Abair

Executive Director, MassBioEd Foundation

Speakers
AC

Aron Clarke

Training Lead, Sanofi
KH

Kenneth Henderson

Dean of the College of Sciences, Northeastern University
DR

Dan Restuccia

Chief Product and Analytics Officer, Burning Glass Technologies


Wednesday November 14, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Junior Ballroom

10:55am

Supporting a Home-to-School Approach in Preschool Curriculum with Low-income Immigrant Families
The Readiness through Integrative Science and Engineering (RISE) project seeks to develop ecologically valid, culturally-relevant integrative science, technology and engineering (STE) preschool curriculum components and home-school connections, forged through exploration of family knowledge, activities, and routines related to STE, to support young dual language learning (DLL) children’s school success. A principal innovation of RISE is the process of co-construction, conceptualized as reciprocal and non-hierarchical engagement by researchers, parents and teachers. RISE was developed and initially implemented in seven Head Start classrooms in a large northeastern city, across two programs serving Latino and Chinese heritage families and their DLL children. We will present the RISE Model of Co-Construction, highlighting the Home-School Collaboration (HSC) component. The HSC component, guided primarily by the work of Joseph Tobin and Luis Moll, is built on the idea that schools can leverage families’ unique contributions to children's learning, rather than trying to overwrite these to get children "ready for school." Essential to our reconceptualization of family engagement is that the home-to-school flow of information is just as important as the school-to-home flow, with a particular focus in RISE on STE learning as the family-school bridge. By effectively connecting children’s familiar knowledge and classroom curriculum, teachers can facilitate powerful learning for children from non-dominant groups (Thompson, 2010). We will present our innovative approach, as well as preliminary evidence of its success, and discuss links to early childhood policy and practice.

Moderators
CM

Christine McWayne

Professor of Child Study and Human Development, Tufts University

Speakers
VD

Virginia Diez

Community Connector, RISE Project, Tufts University
AH

Antonia Hutchinson

Family Advocate, ABCD Head Start, Malden, MA
SH

Sunah Hyun

Doctoral Candidate and Research Assistant, Tufts University


Wednesday November 14, 2018 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room B

1:45pm

Amp It UP! Industry Driven Lessons
The AMP IT UP program is an industry, school, and agency program that provides a day-long mini-externship to STEM teachers in local companies. Teachers observe how the math and science skills that they teach under the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks are applied in the day-to-day activities of these companies. The program includes professional development sequence that embeds the field experience into a resulting lesson extension. As a result, hundreds of students in math, science and engineering classes throughout the north shore are learning about local high tech companies, STEM careers and the importance of mathematics, science and engineering practices.

We will share the professional development model, lesson plan templates and resources developed. Additionally, lesson extension samples will be shared with the group.

Speakers
KC

Katie Crowder

Manager of Youth WD Programs, North Shore Workforce Investment Board
MS

Mary Sarris

Executive Director, North Shore Workforce Investment Board
CS

Christine Shaw

Professional Development Leader, Merrimack College


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Grand Ballroom Center

1:45pm

Beauty and Joy of Computing: A CS Principles Course
Computer science (CS) has been a field dominated by White and Asian men, but the educational community is actively seeking to engage and support female, Black and Latino students in rigorous high school computer science and prepare them for CS in college and the workforce. Come see how the College Board-endorsed AP curriculum Beauty and Joy of Computing (BJC) is teaching students how to program and how technology impacts society using cross-subject-area projects in a visual programming language and collaborative and student-led class discussions on current events. You will collaboratively explore a hands-on introduction to programming with the Snap! language and learn about the AP Computer Science Principles course, the BJC curriculum, and our ongoing research in urban schools. We’ll answer your questions about implementing this free course, the Snap! programming language, and the equity-focused research project, and leave you inspired to explore the Beauty and Joy of Computing with your students. Participants do not need any experience with programming but should bring an Internet-enabled device.

Speakers
MF

Mary Fries

Senior Curriculum and Instructional Design Associate, Education Development Center, Inc.


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Grand Ballroom North

1:45pm

Creating a STEM Pathway through Mentoring, Purpose, and Food Justice
Our Change Maker program brings together youth from Springfield, Waltham and Boston and uses a cross-age, near peer, tiered mentoring model, positive-youth development STEM focus where high school youth will support middle school youth in learning the interdisciplinary science of hydroponics while they grow crops in their urban hydroponic farms. We have established Food Justice Ambassador teams across our three cities consisting of high school youth who will mentor and teach middle school youth in after-school settings with youth alumni (college-students) serving as Food Justice Leaders. Attendees will learn how we have combined three synergistic components into a STEM pathway model: (1) a near-peer mentoring approach, (2) STEM learning, and (3) youth purpose and career development. Unlike other out-of-school STEM programs, our proposed work will not only support the learning of STEM concepts, but it will do so by taking them on a personal journey designed to help them discover the relevance of STEM skills for fulfilling future career aspirations, as well as for contributing to the lives of others. Our approach is different from the many programs that focus on teaching STEM to close the opportunity gap. Rather, our program recognizes the potential for urban youth to become deeply knowledgeable citizens who understand the localization of food injustice within their communities and as such, can mobilize their enhanced STEM knowledge and skills to illuminate/resolve social injustices.

Moderators
MB

Michael Barnett

Professor, Boston College

Speakers
HM

Heather Metallides

Director of Science, Waltham Public Schools
MR

Marcello Rossi

Springfield ChangeMaker Project Lead, Springfield Public Schools
AT

Andrew Trossello

Teacher, Waltham High School


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room A

1:45pm

Designing for Scale to Impact System-wide Student Success
To realize the significant change we seek in student success trajectories, solutions have to be implemented across a system at scale. However, scale can be difficult to achieve and maintain. Designing, launching, and supporting an initiative at scale brings its own unique challenges and benefits. Can an initiative launched at scale support a system-level model for promoting student engagement and success across an entire Commonwealth? This session highlights the efforts of the STEM Starter Academy Initiative, administrated through the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, to support the STEM pipeline at all 15 of the public community colleges in Massachusetts. Through this work the campuses have built upon existing STEM programming to provide a cohesive set of student supports through the coordination of different offices on campuses and by learning from each other on what is working to impact student retention rates and program completion. This work has spawned several vibrant partnerships, and connected an active and diverse learning community that is deeply committed to inter- and intra-campus collaboration.

During this session we will review key steps in designing for scale, highlighting specific instances of success, challenge, and emergent best practice. Audience members will learn about implementing an initiative at the system level (at scale) through the lens of STEM Starter Academy programming. Key steps in the process of implementing and supporting work at scale will be highlighted during this session, as well as the practices and lessons learned that have helped shape this initiative into a true learning community that can be applied to other regional and state-wide partnerships.

Moderators
AL

Allison Little

Executive Director, STEM, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education

Speakers
MA

Meghan Abella-Bowen

Associate Dean for STEM Initiatives, Bristol Community College
JJ

Jeremiah Johnson

Senior Research Manager, UMass Donahue Institute
VK

Valerie Kapilow

STEM Starter Academy Project Director, Massachusetts Bay Community College


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room C

1:45pm

Exciting Students in STEM: STEM Week Reflections and Lessons Learned
The Commonwealth’s inaugural STEM Week in October highlighted the importance of engaging students at all levels in STEM education, activities, and connections to the state’s workforce. In this session, STEM Week hosts, including educators, industry, and non-profit leaders, discuss strategies for building interest and excitement in STEM subjects, and specifically, how they planned STEM Week activities that galvanized students’ attention and energy. The session will also look ahead to STEM Week in 2019 as participants discuss lessons learned and their ideas on how to make STEM Week successful in the years to come.

Moderators
EH

Erin Hashimoto-Martell

Director of STEM, MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Speakers
CC

Chakara Cardillo

8th Grade STEM Teacher, Randolph Community Middle School
SK

Stacey Kaminiski

Executive Director, CONNECT Partnership & Southeast Regional STEM Network
GM

Greg Mullaney

Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, Quinsigamond Community College
RW

Rochelle Willis

Business Development Manager, Skanska


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Grand Ballroom South

1:45pm

Motivate Students with Free Innovative STEAM Resources from Public Libraries
The pipeline to prosperity begins with accessing resources your public library offers for free! Students learn better when their learning is supported in the community. STEAM emphasizes collaboration between schools, science organizations, higher education and business to prepare students for STEM jobs. Public libraries are a place where all of these institutions can come together to reach your students and their families. Public libraries have responded to STEAM with a plethora of free materials, kits, robots, programs, clubs, makerspaces and STEAM Centers. Educators for grades K-4 and school librarians will discover innovative resources available at public libraries throughout MA designed to support students, educators, classrooms, out-of-school activities and parent and community involvement. Learn about library resources specifically for K-4 students and for teacher use in the classroom or on a field trip to the library. Find out about library clubs for young coders, Skype programs with NASA, STEAM kits and centers, makerspaces and circulating telescopes. Explore new ways public librarians, school librarians and K-4 educators can form partnerships. MA Library Systems will provide an overview of statewide offerings. Learn about the Needham Free Public Library’s STEAM Center and their partnership with elementary schools, STEAM Professionals and OLIN College of Engineering. There will be a question and answer/discussion session on how educators and public libraries can work together to support parent and community involvement for student motivation and success.

Speakers
PD

Paula Dugan

Children’s Supervisor, Needham Free Public Library
AM

April Mazza

Youth Services Consultant, MA Library Systems
NT

Nick Tartar

Associate Dean of Student Affairs and PDSO, Olin College of Engineering


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room D

1:45pm

Priming Preschoolers to Enter the Engineering Pipeline through Problem-Solving
Children are born curious about the natural world. Early childhood settings are the perfect environments to harness this curiosity by encouraging questioning and problem solving using principles of engineering. By supporting children as they navigate the principals of engineering, we are priming the pipeline for STEM success. Despite prior research that shows a STEM curriculum that integrates the engineering design process (EDP) encourages cognitive development and child curiosity, there is very little organized STEM or engineering instruction within early childhood classrooms. Some reasons for this include lack of preschool teacher preparation in STEM and a shortage of available early childhood STEM and engineering curricula.  This presentation will offer participants the opportunity to understand how to infuse dynamic STEM opportunities into their own preschool programs by learning about Worcester Head Start’s STEAM initiative and STEAM kits.  Participants will also learn about Head Start’s partnership with Worcester Polytechnic Institute on a federal grant to develop a problem-based preschool STEM curriculum, Seeds of STEM, which exposes preschoolers to engineering vocabulary and an adapted engineering design process.

Moderators
CS

Carlene Sherbourne

Education Manager, Worcester Head Start

Speakers
CB

Colleen Bostwick

Lead Teacher, Worcester Head Start
SC

Suchira Channoi

Lead Teacher, Worcester Head Start
BS

Bernadette Sibuma

Research Scientist, Worcester Polytechnic Institute


Wednesday November 14, 2018 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Junior Ballroom

2:55pm

Co-constructed STE Curriculum in Head Start: Partnership-Based Research for Program Improvement
The Readiness through Integrative Science and Engineering (RISE) project focuses on the purposeful engagement of preschool teachers and children in both the explanation-seeking behavior of science and the problem-solving behavior of engineering and technological endeavors. Specifically, RISE seeks to develop ecologically valid, culturally relevant integrative science, technology and engineering (STE) preschool curriculum components and home-school connections (HSC), forged through exploration of family knowledge, activities, and routines related to STE, to support young dual language learning (DLL) children’s school success. Three Head Start teachers will provide brief presentations about how their curriculum concerning the concept of Living vs. Non-living Things unfolded. These presentations will provide the audience with clear examples of how curriculum implementation can align with, yet vary within, larger national and state frameworks, how a co-construction approach to PD can empower teachers and families, and how evaluation of curriculum and PD programs can measure fidelity to an approach rather than fidelity to a specific curricular script. Implications for application in other settings will be discussed, especially as relevant for informing culturally inclusive curriculum.

Moderators
CM

Christine McWayne

Professor of Child Study and Human Development, Tufts University

Speakers
HC

Heidi Chait

Early Childhood Mentor/Coach, ABCD Head Start, Malden, MA
SC

Suzane Croteau

Lead Teacher, ABCD Head Start, Boston, MA
CP

Cynthia Parker

Lead Coach for the RISE Project, Tufts University


Wednesday November 14, 2018 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room D

2:55pm

Nudging to STEM Success: Supporting Persistence and Completion in STEM Pathways
Evidence is growing that “nudges” grounded in behavioral science can help students persist through college. This session will discuss lessons and early outcomes from a national initiative using behavioral nudging and intelligent software to increase STEM success and completion. Early experimental results show that the nudging support resulted in a 10 percentage-point increase in spring-to-fall persistence.

Beginning in summer 2017, Persistence Plus and Jobs for the Future launched an initiative to support students at four community colleges with text message nudges for college completion. Serving more than 10,000 students, the Nudging to STEM Success project aims to increase persistence rates for entering students, with an emphasis on success in introductory STEM courses. Nudges are grounded in behavioral science and engage students via text message. These interventions are designed to help students develop a strong college-completion and STEM identity by connecting their STEM studies to their personal values and goals. Nudges also encourage students to set and follow through on academic goals and utilize campus supports like tutoring and advising, while revealing hidden barriers and misconceptions that hinder student success. Attendees will learn how schools in this initiative are leveraging behavioral science and mobile technology to help students navigate through college, and see examples of what interactive nudging via text message looks like from the student perspective.

Speakers
SF

Serena Fahnbulleh Crain

Program Operations Lead, Persistence Plus


Wednesday November 14, 2018 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room A